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  Most popular articles (Since September 24, 2018)

 
 
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THE PRACTITIONER / LE PRATICIEN
The occasional nasal fracture
Mary Ollier, Sarah Ollier, Sarah M Giles
January-March 2019, 24(1):18-22
DOI:10.4103/CJRM.CJRM_7_18  PMID:30638193
  440 143 -
ORIGINAL ARTICLES / ARTICLES ORIGINAUX
Fishhook injury in Eastern Newfoundland: Retrospective review
Christopher Patey, Thomas Heeley, Kris Aubrey-Bassler
January-March 2019, 24(1):7-12
DOI:10.4103/CJRM.CJRM_2_18  PMID:30638191
Abstract Introduction: The Canadian island of Newfoundland has a long history of fishing; however, no study to date has developed a regional profile of fishhook injuries on its east coast. Methods: To this end, we conducted a retrospective review of fishhook injuries at all Newfoundland East coast emergency departments from 2013 to 2015. Patient presentations were reviewed for the date of arrival, sex of the patient, location of fishhook injury, tetanus immunisation status, anaesthetic utilisation, diagnostic imaging, antibiotic management and technique of removal. Results: Information was retrieved for 165 patients. Most injuries occurred to the hand (80.6%), and out of five documented techniques, “advance and cut” was the most common extraction method (55.5%). There was a high percentage of prophylactic oral antibiotics prescribed (57%) and X-ray imaging (20%) utilised. Consultation was required for 4.2% of the fishhook injuries including consultation to a local fire department service. Conclusions: On the east coast of Newfoundland, fishhook injuries are addressed inconsistently, with potentially suboptimal methods for removal, coupled with unnecessary imaging and antibiotics. We believe that there is a role for education and other initiatives to improve the care delivered.
  299 102 -
EDITORIALS / ÉDITORIAUX
All new and improved
Nouveau et amélioré

Peter Hutten-Czapski
January-March 2019, 24(1):3-4
DOI:10.4103/CJRM.CJRM_5_18  PMID:30638189
  243 65 -
ORIGINAL ARTICLES / ARTICLES ORIGINAUX
CPRural
Zoe Evans, Bruce Mcknight
January-March 2019, 24(1):13-17
DOI:10.4103/CJRM.CJRM_13_18  PMID:30638192
Introduction: The purpose of our study was to determine if regular cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) practise improved the quality of nurses' chest compressions in a rural hospital. Methods: The study was a prospective interventional trial measuring the effectiveness of brief, monthly CPR practice for rural nurses. The quality of nurses' chest compressions was measured before and after monthly practise with an interactive feedback device at the Golden and District Hospital, a rural facility in BC. Results: All three components of high-quality CPR (depth, recoil and rate) improved significantly. Conclusion: Monthly practise of chest compressions with an interactive feedback device improved the quality and confidence of nurses' CPR skills. These results suggest that a higher frequency of CPR practice (than the minimum annual recertification) would improve both the quality and retention of CPR skills, specifically for low-volume rural hospitals.
  219 71 -
EDITORIALS / ÉDITORIAUX
President's message. R-E-S-P-E-C-T
R-E-S-P-E-C-T

Margaret Tromp
January-March 2019, 24(1):5-6
DOI:10.4103/CJRM.CJRM_6_18  PMID:30638190
  177 52 -
CAREERS/CLASSIFIED
Rural Medicine Careers / Classified

January-March 2019, 24(1):27-28
DOI:10.4103/1203-7796.248450  PMID:30638196
Full text not available  [PDF]  [Mobile Full text]  [EPub]  [PubMed]
  108 117 -
THE PRACTITIONER / LE PRATICIEN
Country cardiograms case 65
Charles Helm, Matthew Embree
January-March 2019, 24(1):23-24
DOI:10.4103/CJRM.CJRM_4_18  PMID:30638194
  131 86 -
Country cardiograms case 65: Answer
Charles Helm, Matthew Embree
January-March 2019, 24(1):25-26
DOI:10.4103/1203-7796.248418  PMID:30638195
  141 66 -